Web Application Development

Web Application Development

Web application development is the process and practice of developing web applications. There is a consensus that the processes involved are extensions of standard software engineering processes. Considering this, along with its unique characteristics, popular frameworks used include the spiral approach and business-oriented approach to application development, among other models that address the requirements for an iterative process. Just as with a traditional desktop application, web applications have varying levels of risk. A personal home page is much less risky than, for example, a stock trading web site. For some projects security, software bugs, etc. are major issues. If time to market, or technical complexity is a concern, documentation, test planning, change control, requirements analysis, architectural description and formal design and construction practices can mitigate risk.

Benifits

With web-based applications, users access the system via a uniform environment—the web browser. While the user interaction with the application needs to be thoroughly tested on different web browsers, the application itself needs only be developed for a single operating system. Here are some of the most popular advantages of Web Application Development for businesses -

  • Accessible anywhere
  • Unlike traditional applications, web systems are accessible anytime, anywhere and via any PC with an Internet connection. This puts the user firmly in charge of where and when they access the application. It also opens up exciting, modern possibilities such as global teams, home working and real-time collaboration. The idea of sitting in front of a single computer and working in a fixed location is a thing of the past with web-based applications.

  • Easily customisable
  • The user interface of web-based applications is easier to customise than is the case with desktop applications. This makes it easier to update the look and feel of the application or to customise the presentation of information to different user groups. Therefore, there is no longer any need for everyone to settle for using exactly the same interface at all times. Instead, you can find the perfect look for each situation and user.

  • Accessible for a range of devices
  • In addition to being customisable for user groups, content can also be customised for use on any device connected to the internet. This includes the likes of PDAs, mobile phones and tablets. This further extends the user’s ability to receive and interact with information in a way that suits them. In this way, the up to date information is always at the fingertips of the people who need it.

  • Improved interoperability
  • It is possible to achieve a far greater level of interoperability between web applications than it is with isolated desktop systems. For example, it is much easier to integrate a web-based shopping cart system with a web-based accounting package than it is to get two proprietary systems to talk to each other.

  • Adaptable to increased workload
  • Increasing processor capacity also becomes a far simpler operation with web-based applications. If an application requires more power to perform tasks only the server hardware needs to be upgraded. The capacity of web-based software can be increased by “clustering” or running the software on several servers simultaneously. As workload increases, new servers can be added to the system easily.

Technology is just a tool. In terms of getting the kids working together and motivating them, the teacher is the most important.